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Parking a Motorcycle in a Car Space?

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There are probably more than one or two motorcyclists out there who have felt the wrath of a car owner at some time in their riding career, having parked their bike in a car space. So we thought we’d put the issue to bed once and for all.

Most people driving cars seem to have some pretty clear views on the whole issue but are they right. Can you park your motorcycle in a car space?

The answer is, as a rule, yes, motorcyclists can legally park in a car space; However, there are different rules in different jurisdictions and different rules within municipalities.

Parking-a-Motorcycle-in-a-Car-Space-micramoto

Parking a Motorcycle in a Car Space?

When asking this question, riders also asked about sidewalk parking, parking between cars, sharing a car space, and using a parking garage. The following table summarizes the situation in each state, Canada, and Mexico.

Some states provide directions on how a motorcycle is expected to park. Where there has been credible information from local motorcyclists regarding a specific jurisdiction, this has also been included.

State or Country

Park-in Car Space?

Park on Sidewalk?

Park between Cars?

Share a Car Space?

Car Garage?

Alabama: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb.

No

No, unless spaces are not marked out Yes, if unmetered, If metered, then one motorcycle per space. It depends on the garage owner, but many have spaces designated for motorcycles
Alaska: Yes, but there are no state-wide or county parking laws in Alaska. Instead, individual towns set their own rules.

It depends on the town

It depends on the town Yes, if unmetered, If metered, then one motorcycle per space. It depends on the garage owner, but many have spaces designated for motorcycles
Arizona: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb.

No

No, unless spaces are not marked out

Yes

Depends on the garage owner.
Arkansas:

Yes

No

No, unless spaces are not marked out

Yes

Depends on the garage owner. If yes, then one motorcycle per space.
California: Yes, although there are local ordinances in some towns that prevent it. One wheel must touch the curb. No, but some jurisdictions do not enforce, so do so at your own risk. For example, legally, parts of a motorcycle can overhang the sidewalk by 10 inches.

Yes, but make sure cars have room to get out, and one wheel must be touching the curb.

Yes, but not recommended as some law enforcement will ticket, and you will have to go through court to overturn the ticket.

It depends on the garage owner, but many do not allow it.

Colorado:

Yes

No, except in an emergency. Unclear Unclear Depends on the garage owner.
Connecticut:

Yes

No

Unclear Unclear Depends on the garage owner.
Delaware: Yes, park perpendicular with the rear wheel to curb

No

Unclear Unclear Depends on the garage owner.
Florida:

Yes

No, but if the motorcycle is not impeding the sidewalk in some areas, it is overlooked. No, unless spaces are not marked out Yes, if unmetered, If metered, then one motorcycle per space. Depends on the garage owner.
Georgia:

Yes

No, there is a $50 fine No No Depends on the garage owner.
Hawaii: Yes. Hawaii also offers free motorcycle parking areas in a number of places. No Yes Yes Depends on the garage owner.
Idaho: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb. No Unclear Unclear Depends on the garage owner.
Illinois: Yes No Unclear Unclear No, although some private providers may allow it.
Indiana: Yes, the rear wheel of the motorcycle to the curb and with the front tire facing the flow of traffic. No Unclear Unclear Depends on the garage owner.
Iowa: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb. No Unclear Unclear Depends on the garage owner.
Kansas:

Yes

No Unclear Unclear Depends on the garage owner.
Kentucky:

Yes

No Unclear Unclear Depends on the garage owner.
Louisiana: Yes, park at a 90-degree angle to the curb with the rear wheel touching curb. No Unclear Unclear Depends on the garage owner.
Maine:

Yes

No Unclear Unclear Depends on the garage owner.
Maryland: Yes

No

Yes, but it depends on the municipality. Yes, but it depends on the municipality. Yes, if the state-owned otherwise, it depends on the garage owner, but many do not.
Massachusetts: Yes Yes, but technically an infringement so do so at your own risk

Yes

Yes

Unclear

Michigan: Yes No No Yes, but each bike must be within the park Depends on the garage owner
Minnesota: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. No Unclear Yes, but each bike must be within the park Depends on the garage owner
Missouri: Yes, park at a 90-degree angle to the curb with the rear wheel touching the curb. No Unclear Yes, but each bike must be within the park Depends on the garage owner
Mississippi: Yes, park at a 90-degree angle to the curb with the rear wheel touching curb. No No

Yes

Depends on the garage owner
Montana:

Yes

No No

Unclear

Depends on the garage owner
Nebraska: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb.

No

Unclear

Unclear

Depends on the garage owner.
New Hampshire: Yes No Unclear Yes, but each motorcycle must have its own meter receipt. Depends on the garage owner
Nevada: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb. No No Yes, but each motorcycle must have its own meter receipt.

 

Depends on the garage owner.
New Jersey: Yes No No Yes, but some municipalities specifically exclude this practice. Depends on the garage owner. A number refuse to allow motorcycles.

 

New Mexico: Yes No Unclear

Yes

Depends on the garage owner,
New York: Yes No No Yes, but in the past, NYC has ticketed riders for not taking the whole park. This is not enforced any longer. Depends on the garage owner
North Carolina: Depends on the municipality. Some expressly prohibit motorcyclists parking in metered spaces. No Unclear Depends on the municipality.  Some specifically exclude. Depends on the garage owner
North Dakota: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb. No Unclear

Yes

Depends on the garage owner
Ohio: Yes No Unclear No, but not usually enforced. Depends on the garage owner
Oklahoma: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb. No, but often not enforced.

Yes

Yes, but the maximum of two motorcycles Depends on the garage owner. An increasing number do not.
Oregon: Yes No Yes Yes, but all bikes must be within the park Depends on the garage owner.
Pennsylvania: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. No, unless the rider is a resident in certain areas. Previously it had been allowed.

Yes

Yes, but there are some areas where it is specifically banned. Depends on the garage owner.
Rhode Island: Yes, but RI has legislated and requires the government to provide motorcycle parks. No, but often not enforced, so do so at your own risk. Unclear Yes Depends on the garage owner.
South Carolina: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb. No Unclear Yes. some municipalities allow a maximum of 2 bikes Depends on the garage owner.
South Dakota: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb. No Unclear Yes, some municipalities allow a maximum of 2 bikes Depends on the garage owner.
Tennessee: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb. No Unclear

Yes

Depends on the garage owner.
Texas: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb. No, but depending on where you are, it may not be enforced. Unclear Yes Depends on the garage owner.
Utah: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb.

No

No Unclear Depends on the garage owner.
Vermont: Yes, park with rear-wheel at curb and motorcycle on an angle. Some cities have ordinances requiring you to park parallel to the curb. No No Unclear Depends on the garage owner.
West Virginia: Yes, park at a 90-degree angle to the curb with the rear wheel touching curb. No Unclear Yes, but each bike must be within the park Depends on the garage owner.
Washington:

Yes

No Unclear Yes, in some instances, each motorcycle must display proof of payment. Depends on the garage owner.
Wisconsin:

Yes

No No Yes, up to 3 motorcycles may share. Depends on the garage owner.
Wyoming: Yes, park at a 90-degree angle to the curb with the rear wheel touching curb. No No Yes, but each bike must be within the park Depends on the garage owner.
Canada: Yes No No Yes Depends on the garage owner.
Mexico: Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Although this is the position at a state level, there is still significant variation between the municipalities within it. For this reason, it is recommended you check with law enforcement if you are unsure.

In several instances, there was clear evidence that specific codes were not being enforced. While this appears credible, you accept this at your own risk. Bear in mind, Judges seldom buy the “But Bill told me I could” defense.

If parking within a university or college campus, you will need to check the rules as they are usually very different from the state code. Finally, surprisingly many parking garages do not allow motorcycles, so you will need to check individual garages if you plan to use them.

About the author:  Michael Parrotte was the Vice President of AGV Helmets America, and a consultant for KBC Helmets, Vemar Helmets, Suomy Helmets, Marushin Helmets, KYT Helmets, Sparx Helmets. In addition, he is the founder and owner of AGV Sports Group.