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Isle of Man TT

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The Isle of Man TT is a time-trial event held on public roads that have been closed to the public according to an Act of Tynwald (the parliament of the Isle of Man). The event is divided into two parts: one week of practice and one week of racing.

During the Isle of Man TT on “Mad Sunday,” an informal and unofficial sanctioned event held on the Sunday between “Practice Week” and “Race Week,” it has been a custom, may be established by racing participants in the early 1920s, for fans to traverse the Snaefell Mountain Course on motorcycles.

The Isle of Man TT is held on public roads that have been closed to the public according to an Act of Tynwald (the parliament of the Isle of Man).

The following is a list of fatal accidents that occurred on the Isle of Man TT Mountain Course, which is used for the Isle of Man TT races, Manx Grand Prix, and Classic TT events.

The Tourist Trophy event for racing automobiles, formerly known as the Four Inch Course, was held on the TT Course for the first time in 1908.

tourist-trophy2-micramoto

The UK Auto-Cycle Club transferred the 1911 Isle of Man TT race motor-cycle races from the St. John’s Short Course to the ‘Four Inch Course,’ which became known as the Isle of Man TT Mountain Course or ‘TT Course’ when used for motor-cycle racing.

With a few exceptions, the Isle of Man TT is an annual motorcycle race held on the Isle of Man in the middle of the year since 1907. It is one of the most widely panned motorsport events, having been dubbed “one of the world’s most dangerous racing events” numerous times.

After an accident at Glen Helen during practice for the 1911 Isle of Man TT races, Victor Surridge became the first death on the Isle of Man TT Mountain Course. This was possibly the first time a person died in a motorcycle or car accident on the Isle of Man.

Glen-Helen-micramoto

The Isle of Man TT Mountain Course had its worst year in 2005 when 11 individuals died in total over the two main racing events. During that year’s Isle of Man TT racing season in June, four people died (three riders and one marshal), while six riders and one bystander along the course perished during the Manx Grand Prix in August/September.

Every year since 1907, the event has been staged on the secluded British island. The only time racing was not held was during World Wars I and II (1915-1919, 1940-1945). The event is divided into two weeks: the first is dedicated to time trials and practice sessions, while the second is dubbed “race week” and is when the various racing events take place.

The competition is divided into two parts: one week of practice and one week of racing. During the Isle of Man TT on “Mad Sunday,” an informal and unofficial sanctioned event held on the Sunday between “Practice Week” and “Race Week,” it has been a tradition, possibly started by racing competitors in the early 1920s, for spectators to ride motorcycles around the Snaefell Mountain Course.

The Isle of Man TT moved to the significantly longer Snaefell Mountain Course in 1911, which was 37.40 miles (60.19 kilometers) long (now 37.73 miles (60.72 kilometers) long. It rises from sea level to a height of 1,300 feet.

Isle-of-Man-TT-micramoto (2)

The Isle of Man TT racing schedule grew from a single race with two classes in 1907 to two separate races in 1911 for the 350cc Junior TT motorcycles and the Blue Riband event, the 500cc Senior TT race. Due to the First World War, the race was not held from 1915 until 1919. It was resurrected in 1920.

In 1922, the Isle of Man TT program was expanded to include a 250cc Lightweight TT race, followed by a Sidecar TT race in 1923. Due to the Second World War, there was no racing on the Isle of Man between 1940 and 1945. It was revived in 1946 with the Manx Grand Prix and the Isle of Man TT, with a much-expanded schedule that included the new Clubman’s TT races.

During the years 1949–1976, the Isle of Man TT was a part of the FIM Motorcycle Grand Prix World Championship (now MotoGP) as the British round of the World Motor-Cycling Championship.

Following safety concerns with the Snaefell Mountain Course and issues with insufficient “start-money” for participants, many of the top competitors, motorcycle manufacturers, and national motorcycling organizations boycotted the Isle of Man TT races beginning in the early 1970s.

Due to the Second World War, there was no racing on the Isle of Man between 1940 and 1945. It was revived in 1946 with the Manx Grand Prix and the Isle of Man TT, with a much-expanded schedule that included the new Clubman’s TT races.

During the years 1949–1976, the Isle of Man TT was a part of the FIM Motorcycle Grand Prix World Championship (now MotoGP) as the British round of the World Motor-Cycling Championship.

Following safety concerns with the Snaefell Mountain Course and issues with insufficient “start-money” for participants, many of the top competitors, motorcycle manufacturers, and national motorcycling organizations boycotted the Isle of Man TT races beginning in the early 1970s.

The Isle of Man TT lost its world championship status in 1976, and the FIM transferred it to the United Kingdom for the 1977 season, which was conducted as the British Grand Prix.

Between 1977 and 1990, the Isle of Man TT Races became a vital element of the new style TT Formula 1, Formula 2, and Formula 3 World Championships to grow and sustain the Isle of Man TT Races’ international racing prestige.

From 1989 forward, the Isle of Man Department of Tourism renamed the event the Isle of Man TT Festival. The Pre-TT Classic Races in 1989 and the Post-TT Races in 1991, both staged on the Billown Circuit, were among the new racing events for the revised Isle of Man TT Festival program.

Billown-Circuit-micramoto

The Isle of Man Department of Economic Development and the Auto-Cycle Union created the Isle of Man Classic TT in 2013 for antique racing bikes, and it now runs alongside the Manx Grand Prix as part of the ‘Isle of Man Festival of Motorcycling,’ which takes place in late August each year.

The event has received some criticism. A cyclist and two spectators were killed in an accident during the Senior Race in 2007.  The inquest that followed made several recommendations and made several observations, including: ‘Senior Marshals may possibly have been elevated above their domain of competence.’

In addition, the coroner stated that “The witnesses from the Manx Motorcycle Club and the marshals are all volunteers. They volunteer their efforts without expecting anything in return.

In 2018, a solo racer was critically injured in a head-on collision with an official Course Car transporting police officials to officiate at a fatality farther along the course. After the red flag stoppage, he was one of seven riders who were held on the course and turned back by marshals, who were directed to return to the paddock area in the other way.

The Isle of Man TT Races, which were scheduled to take place between May 30 and June 13, 2020, was postponed as the island stepped up its efforts to safeguard its residents from the COVID-19 epidemic.

Why Isle of Man TT is so dangerous?

There have been over 255 deaths on the racetrack since it began in 1907. Five riders died during practice and race weeks in 2016.

During this race, danger lurks around every bend and turn of the route. When driving at speeds of up to 150 mph down a tiny street and then attempting to navigate the perfect apex, there isn’t much room for error. Here are some of the other threats you can face:

  • Unfavorable weather
  • Hazards on the road (oil, small furry animals, birds)
  • On the tight racetrack, there isn’t much room for error.
  • Failure of the mechanical system
  • There is no runoff area (telephone poles, curbs, and other city life hazards are numerous)

Isle-of-man-TT-weather-micramotoThe Isle of Man TT is often referred to as the ultimate proving ground for riders and their bikes, but it isn’t just the dazzling display of skill that has made the TT so famous. The risk involved in racing on the island is a big draw for the event, because, as one racer put it, “if you get it wrong around here, you’re done nine times out of ten.”

It’s no wonder, then, that pushing a motorcycle to its limits on back roads has resulted in disaster on several occasions. The TT has claimed the lives of 251 people since 1907. Official contestants accounted for 146 of the 251 lives lost. The remaining 105 were members of the public who were testing their luck (or lack thereof) on the cougar.

The brutal reality is that about 1 percent of the people who come to race on the Isle of Man will be killed or maimed there. Horrific accidents are common among the spectators, too.

The race is in jeopardy. Given that motorcycle racing on FIA-regulated tracks, such as those used for Formula 1 and Le Mans, can be deemed too dangerous for the easily upset racing bikes due to large, sweeping runoff areas and gravel traps, the narrow, poorly protected Isle of Man roads – which, after all, are only public roads – are far from fit.

It is extremely likely that a death will occur during the race weekend; in fact, there has been at least one death every year since 2001, with more than one death occurring around half of the time. Both drivers and spectators put themselves in grave danger, and the death toll is unjustifiably high.

The Isle of Man TT, dubbed “the most dangerous motorsport event on the planet,” is not without controversy. Amateurs and professionals put their lives on the line, flying down bumpy, uneven roads at speeds of up to 150 mph.

As a result, the Isle of Man TT races are anachronisms, harkening back to a time when men were men and danger was a laughingstock. Because the TT, which celebrates its 100th anniversary this week, is arguably the deadliest athletic event on the planet. Richard ‘Milky’ Quayle can attest to this.

Every year, individuals die attempting to summit Everest, although the goal is seen as honorable. The TT racers have their own version of Mount Everest. Snaefell is a 2,036-foot peak in Iceland. And, hopefully, the view they receive of the sixth kingdom when they’re up there will be fleeting.

It is without a doubt one of the most dangerous motorcycle races on the planet. In TT Isle of Man – Ride On the Edge 2, you compete in many championships before tackling the Snaefell Mountain Course, a 60-kilometer circuit with both twisting and straight sections that will test your riding abilities. 17 new tracks, 18 different motorcycles, including classic versions, and the official riders are all included in TT 2.

And now, with to completely overhauled mechanics and faithfully replicated rider movements, it’s more lifelike than ever. To stay competitive, fine-tune your motorcycle, improve its performance, and analyze its data in real-time.

Things that are the deadliest:

Victor Surridge died after crashing his Rudge motorcycle on the Snaefell Mountain course for the first time, and it was the first reported death of a person in an automotive accident in the Isle of Man.

Since then, approximately 250 (253 to be exact) people have died on the Snaefell Mountain Course, including approximately 100 public and spectators and around 150 officiants. Six people died on the road course in 1970 (the bloodiest year of the IOMTT).

This event was dubbed “38 miles of terror…a test of nerves and speed that may be the world’s most dangerous athletic event” by a writer named Franz Lidz. Probably the only race on the planet where fans are only a few feet away from bikes traveling at speeds of over 200 mph.

There is no track in this event. Instead, 37.7 kilometers of the Snaefell Mountain Course (public roads) will be transformed into a track with no catch barriers, no runoff zone, no soft landings, and unprotected hazards such as trees, buildings, and old stone walls.

There are approximately 250 bends, and the cyclist must accelerate at each corner to boost their average speed, making the race increasingly dangerous. The geography of the course changes from the town of Douglas on the South-East coast to the town of Douglas on the North-West coast.

The race is in jeopardy. Given that motorcycle racing on FIA-regulated tracks, such as those used for Formula 1 and Le Mans, can be deemed too dangerous for the easily upset racing bikes due to large, sweeping runoff areas and gravel traps, the narrow, poorly protected Isle of Man roads – which, after all, are only public roads – are far from fit.

It is extremely likely that a death will occur during the race weekend; in fact, there has been at least one death every year since 2001, with more than one death occurring around half of the time. Both drivers and spectators put themselves in grave danger, and the death toll is unjustifiably high.

To maintain control, the island closes its busiest streets and highways. The road is lined with tens of thousands of spectators from all around the world who have come to watch. Motorcycles speed down tiny, potholed roads, weaving between buildings, trees, and stone walls at speeds exceeding 300 km/h.

It’s terrifyingly deadly, as you might expect; far, far more dangerous than Moto GP. (That is the name of the current motorcycle racing world championship.) Until the early 1970s, when the top Grand Prix riders boycotted it for safety reasons, the TT was the British round of the championship.) The harsh reality is that roughly 1% of those who visit the Isle of Man to race will be killed or maimed.

Everything is a total blur. One wrong flinch, one stone on the course, or one bird flying in front of you is enough to just end it all.

Like Europe’s other major road courses, this is not a sanitized, barrier-lined circuit. Only the speed of the bikes—and the brutality of the crashes—have changed in almost a century. No catch fences, drainage zones, or gentle landings are present.

Unprotected roadside hazards—trees, buildings, old stone walls, even spectators—are only a few feet away, everything reduced to a blur as racers pass past at speeds reaching 200 mph.

The Isle of Man TT road races are the world’s most difficult and dangerous race meetings.

What is the best way to get to the Isle of Man?

Traveling to the Isle of Man can be accomplished in one of two ways: by ferry or by air. The Isle of Man has excellent aviation connections with a number of airports. People arriving by air will land at Ronaldsway Airport (the island’s lone airport) in the south of the island, where many buses will carry them to other locations such as Douglas, Port Erin, and Castletown.

However, the best way to get to the Isle of Man is by sea. During the Tour de France, ferry services operate from Heysham, Liverpool, Birkenhead, Dublin, and Belfast, with a number of additional sailings. When traveling in this manner, people have the freedom to carry whatever they choose.

In the 1970 TT, Spanish rider Santiago Herrero lost control of his 250cc OSSA in the Lightweight category after hitting a spot of melted tar at the 13th milestone (Westwood Corner). Herrero died two days later from his injuries as well as the consequences of irreparable shock. He was one of six riders killed in the 1970 race, prompting calls to abolish the TT.

The epidemic also forced the TT races in 2021 to be canceled. A complete list of deaths through Isle of Man TT is explained below.

No Country of Citizenship Name of Rider Death Date Death Place Race Race type Motorcycle model
1 England Victor Surridge June 27, 1911 Glen Helen Isle of Man TT Practice Rudge-Whitworth
2 England Frank R Bateman June 6, 1913 Creg-ny-Baa Isle of Man TT Senior TT 499cc Rudge
3 United Kingdom Fred Walker May 19, 1914 St Ninian’s Crossroads Isle of Man TT Junior TT Royal Enfield
4 England J.H.H. Veasey June 15, 1923 Greeba Bridge Isle of Man TT Senior TT 500cc Douglas
5 England Archie Birkin June 7, 1927 Rhencullen Isle of Man TT Practice 500cc McEvoy
6 England John Cooke June 15, 1927 East Snaefell Mountain Gate Isle of Man TT Lightweight TT 249cc DOT
7 England Cecil Ashby June 10, 1929 Ballacraine Isle of Man TT Junior TT New Imperial
8 England Doug Lamb June 14, 1929 Greeba Bridge Isle of Man TT Senior TT 500cc Norton
9 England Freddie Hicks June 19, 1931 Union Mills Isle of Man TT Senior TT AJS
10 England Frank Longman June 14, 1933 Glentramman Isle of Man TT Lightweight TT Excelsior
11 England Syd Crabtree June 13, 1934 Stonebreakers Hut Isle of Man TT Lightweight TT Excelsior
12 England J.A. MacDonald June 17, 1935 Union Mills Isle of Man TT Junior TT Norton
13 England Doug Pirie June 19, 1935 33rd Milestone Isle of Man TT Lightweight TT New Imperial
14 England Jack Moore June 13, 1938 East Mountain Gate Isle of Man TT Junior TT Norton
15 Germany Karl Gall June 2, 1939 Ballaugh Bridge Isle of Man TT Practice 494cc BMW
16 Isle of Man Frank Windsor June 16, 1939 Highlander Inn Isle of Man TT Road traffic accident Bystander
17 Isle of Man Donald Cameron June 16, 1939 Highlander Inn Isle of Man TT Road traffic accident Pit Attendant
18 England Johan Erik van Tilburg May 28, 1948 Windy Corner Isle of Man TT Practice 348 cc AJS
19 England Thomas Bryant June 3, 1948 Hillberry Corner Isle of Man TT Practice Velocette
20 England Neil (‘Noel’) Christmas June 11, 1948 Douglas Road Corner Isle of Man TT Senior TT 500cc Norton
21 England Ben Drinkwater June 13, 1949 11th Milestone Isle of Man TT Junior TT 350cc Norton
22 England John Makaula-White May 29, 1950 Handley’s Corner Isle of Man TT Practice 500cc Triumph
23 England Thomas A. Westfield May 30, 1950 Keppel Gate Isle of Man TT Practice 500cc Triumph
24 England Leonard C. Bolshaw May 29, 1951 32nd Milestone Isle of Man TT Practice – Senior Clubmans Triumph
25 England John P. O’Driscoll May 31, 1951 33rd Milestone Isle of Man TT Practice Rudge
26 England John T. Wenman June 4, 1951 Rhencullen Hill/Bishopscour Isle of Man TT Junior TT Norton
27 England Doug L. Parris June 4, 1951 Bungalow Isle of Man TT Junior Clubman Race Douglas
28 England John Simister May 28, 1951 East Mountain Gat Isle of Man TT Practice
29 England Chris Horn 8 June 1951 Laurel Bank Isle of Man TT Senior TT Race Norton
30 England Frank Fry 4 June 1952 Westwood Corner Isle of Man TT Practice Norton
31 England Harry L Stephen 8 June 1953 Bishopscourt Isle of Man TT Junior TT Norton
32 England Thomas W. Swarbrick 8 June 1953 13th Milestone Isle of Man TT Junior TT 350cc AJS
33 England Les Graham 12 June 1953 Quarterbridge Road Isle of Man TT Senior TT 500cc MV Agusta
34 Australia Geoffrey G. Walker 12 June 1953 Kerrowmoar Isle of Man TT Senior TT Norton
35 England Raymond G. Ashford 7 June 1954 Laurel Bank Isle of Man TT Practice 350cc BSA
36 England Simon Sandys-Winsch 18 June 1954 Highlander Isle of Man TT Senior TT 350cc Velocette
37 Australia Laurie Boulter 31 May 1954 Handleys Corner Isle of Man TT Practice Norton
38 England David Merridan 11 June 1956 Ballaugh Bridge Isle of Man TT Practice 499cc BSA Gold Star
39 Wales Peter G. Kirkham 14 June 1956 Waterworks Isle of Man TT Junior Clubmans 350cc BSA
40 England Charles F. Salt 7 June 1957 Gorse Lea Isle of Man TT Senior TT BSA
41 New Zeland John F. Antram 26 May 1958 Cruickshank’s Isle of Man TT Practice AJS
42 New Zeland Desmond D. Woolf 6 June 1958 Cronk Villa Cottage/Barregarrow Isle of Man TT Senior TT 498cc Norton
43 England Michael T. Brookes 10 June 1961 Glentramman 1961 Isle of Man TT Practice 499cc Norton
44 Switzerland Marie Lambert 12 June 1961 Gob-ny-Geay Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT (Passenger) BMW
45 England Ralph Rensen 16 June 1961 11th Milestone Isle of Man TT Senior TT Norton
46 Australia Tom Phillis 6 June 1962 Laurel Bank Isle of Man TT Junior TT 285cc Honda
47 Australia Colin Meehan 6 June 1962 Union Mills Isle of Man TT Junior TT 349cc AJS
48 England Brian W. Cockrell 2 June 1964 Braddan Bridge Isle of Man TT Practice Norton
49 England Laurence P. Essery 9 June 1964 Ballaugh Bridge Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT (Passenger) Matchless
50 Japan Toshio Fujii 26 August 1966 Cruickshank’s Corner Isle of Man TT Practice 125cc Kawasaki[115][116]
51 Spain Brian Duffy 28 August 1966 Mountain Box Isle of Man TT Lightweight TT 250cc Yamaha
52 England Alfred E Shaw 10 June 1967 Mountain Box Isle of Man TT Practice 500cc Norton
53 New Zeland Ian D. Veitch 10 June 1968 Ballagarey Corner Isle of Man TT Lightweight TT Kawasaki
54 England Arthur Lavington 6 June 1969 Alpine Cottage Isle of Man TT Practice 350cc Velocette
55 England Les Iles 1 June 1970 Kate’s Cottage Isle of Man TT Practice 125cc Bultaco
56 England Michael Collins 3 June 1970 Verandah Isle of Man TT Practice 496cc Seeley
57 England Denis Blower 3 June 1970 Mountain Box Isle of Man TT Practice 499cc BSA Sidecar
58 Spain Santiago Herrero 8 June 1970 13th Milestone Isle of Man TT Lightweight TT 250cc Ossa
59 Malta John Wetherall 12 June 1970 Gardener’s Lane/Glen Auldyn Isle of Man TT Senior TT 499cc Norton
60 Ireland Brian Steenson 12 June 1970  Mountain Box Isle of Man TT Senior TT 498cc Seeley
61 England Brian Finch 9 June 1971    Ballacraine Isle of Man TT 500 cc Production Race Suzuki T500
62 England Maurice A. Jeffery 12 June 1971    Birkin’s Bend Isle of Man TT Senior TT 499cc Manx Norton
63 Italy Gilberto Parlotti 9 June 1972  Verandah Isle of Man TT Ultra-Lightweight TT 125cc Morbidelli
64 England John L. Clarke 2 June 1973  Union Mills Isle of Man TT 250cc Production TT Suzuki T20 Super Six
65 England Peter L. Hardy 27 May 1974  Laurel Bank Isle of Man TT Practice – Sidecar 750cc HTS – Imp
66 England David J. Nixon 1 June 1974  Glen Helen Isle of Man TT 1000cc Production TT 741cc Triumph Trident
67 England Peter McKinley 28 May 1975  Pinfold Cottage, Milntown Isle of Man TT Practice 700cc Yamaha
68 England Phil Gurner 4 June 1975  Pinfold Cottage, Milntown Isle of Man TT Senior TT 351cc Yamaha
69 West Germany Walter Wörner 7 June 1976  Greeba Castle  Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT 496cc Yamaha
70 England Les Kenny 12 June 1976  Snugborough, Braddan Isle of Man TT Lightweight TT 250cc Yamaha
71 Wales Stephen Davies 1 June 1978  Laurel Bank Isle of Man TT Practice 347cc Yamaha
72 England Mac Hobson 5 June 1978  Bray Hill[14]  Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT 750cc Yamaha
73 England Kenny Birch 5 June 1978  Bray Hill Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT(Passenger) 750cc Yamaha
74 Switerland Ernst Trachsel 5 June 1978  Quarterbridge Road Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT 499cc Suzuki
75 Sweden Michael Adler 9 June 1978  Glen Helen Isle of Man TT Classic TT 350cc Yamaha
76 England Steve Verne 4 June 1979  Barregarrow  Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT (Passenger) 738cc Suzuki
77 United Kingdom Fred Launchbury 8 June 1979 Glentramman Isle of Man TT Formula III 248cc Maico
78 England Martin B. Ames 31 May 1980  Quarterbridge Road  Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT 750cc Yamaha
79 England Andrew M. Holme 2 June 1980  Glentramman Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT Yamaha
80 England Roger W. Corbett 6 June 1980  Glen Helen Isle of Man TT Classic Race 948cc Kawasaki 
81 Isle of Man Kenneth M. Blake 9 June 1981  Ballagarey Corner Isle of Man TT Senior TT 350cc Yamaha
82 United Kingdom Roger J. Cox 29 May 1984  Sarah’s Cottage Isle of Man TT Sidecar Practice 750cc Yamaha
83 Sweden Sven Tomas Eriksson 28 May 1985  Alpine Cottage – (Iceman’s House) Isle of Man TT Practice Sidecar TT 750cc Yamaha
84 Sweden Mats Urban Eriksson 28 May 1985  Alpine Cottage- (Iceman’s House) Isle of Man TT Practice – Sidecar TT (Passenger) 750cc Yamaha
85 England Rob Vine 7 June 1985  Black Dub Isle of Man TT Senior TT 500cc RG Suzuki
86 Isle of Man Ian Ogden 28 May 1986  Cronk-y-Voddy Isle of Man TT Practice 500cc Suzuki
87 Scotland Alan G. Jarvis 30 May 1986  Quarterbridge Road Isle of Man TT Practice 750cc Yamaha
88 United Kingdom Eugene P. McDonnell 4 June 1986 Ballaugh Bridge Isle of Man TT Lightweight TT 250cc EMC
89 Isle of Man Andy Cooper 6 June 1986  Ballig Isle of Man TT Senior TT 750cc Suzuki
90 United Kingdom Ricky Dumble 2 June 1988 Quarterbridge Road Isle of Man TT Practice 750cc Yamaha
91 Republic of Ireland Kenneth N. Harmer 3 June 1988 Waterworks Isle of Man TT Practice 750cc Honda RC 30
92 Scotland Brian Warburton 3 June 1988 Appledene Isle of Man TT Production TT 600cc Honda
93 Italy Marco Fattorelli 30 May 1989 Greeba Castle Isle of Man TT Practice 750cc Yamaha
94 United Kingdom John Mulcahy 30 May 1989 Barregarrow Isle of Man TT Practice 1300cc Suzuki
95 Austria Phil Hogg 2 June 1989 Ballagarey Corner Isle of Man TT Practice 250cc TZ Yamaha
96 United Kingdom Phil Mellor 7 June 1989 Doran’s Bend Isle of Man TT Production TT 1100cc GSXR Suzuki
97 United Kingdom Steve Henshaw 7 June 1989 Quarry Bends Isle of Man TT Production TT 1000cc FZR Yamaha 
98 United Kingdom Ian Young 28 May 1991 Appledene Isle of Man TT Practice Suzuki RGV 250cc 
99 United Kingdom Petr Hlavatka 29 May 1991 The Nook Isle of Man TT Practice 750cc Suzuki 
100 United Kingdom Frank Duffy 30 May 1991 Kerrowmoar Isle of Man TT Practice 125cc Honda
101 England Roy Anderson 1 June 1991 Stonebreakers Hut Isle of Man TT Formula 1 TT 750cc Yamaha 
102 Austria Manfred Stengl 6 June 1992  33rd Milestone Isle of Man TT Formula 1 TT 750cc Suzuki 
103 United Kingdom Steve Harding 9 June 1993 Laurel Bank Isle of Man TT 600cc Supersport Race 600cc FZR Yamaha
104 Scotland Rob Mitchell 2 June 1994  Gooseneck Isle of Man TT Practice Yamaha FZR 600cc 
105 United Kingdom Mark Farmer 2 June 1994  Black Dub Isle of Man TT Practice Britten V-Twin 1000cc 
106 Republic of Ireland Paul Fargher 3 June 1995 Sulby Straight Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT (Passenger) 600cc Yamaha
107 England Aaron Kennedy 27 May 1996  Crosby Cross-Roads Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT Practice(Passenger) 600cc Kawasaki
108 New Zeland Rob Holden 31 May 1996  Glen Helen Isle of Man TT Practice 916 Ducati
109 United Kingdom Mick Lofthouse 31 May 1996  Pinfold Cottage (Sky Hill) Isle of Man TT Practice 250cc Spondon Yamaha
110 United Kingdom Stephen J. Tannock 1 June 1996[202] Churchtown Isle of Man TT Formula 1 TT Honda RC 30
111 England Russell Waring 26 May 1997[203] Union Mills Isle of Man TT Practice 125cc TZ Yamaha
112 England Colin Gable 26 May 1997[205] Ballagarey Corner Isle of Man TT Practice 750cc Honda
113 Isle of Man Mike Casey 8 June 1998 Ballagarey Corner Isle of Man TT Practice Honda RS 250cc
114 Wales Charles I Hardisty 12 June 1998 Kerrowmoar Isle of Man TT Production TT Kawasaki ZXR7RR
115 United Kingdom John Henderson 12 June 1998 Rhencullen Isle of Man TT Senior TT Honda 750cc
116 Jack Trustham 9 June 1998 Kirk Michael Isle of Man TT Lap of Honour Imp Classic 998cc
117 Netherland Bernadette Bosman-Saalbrink 31 May 1999 Douglas Road Corner, Kirk Michael Isle of Man TT Practice Sidecar TT (Passenger) 600cc Ireson Yamaha
118 England Simon Beck 1 June 1999 33rd Milestone Isle of Man TT Practice Honda RC45
119 England Terry Fenton 7 June 1999 Hillberry Corner Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT (Passenger) Honda CBR 600cc
120 New Zeland Stuart Murdoch 9 June 1999 Gorse Lea Isle of Man TT Junior TT Honda 600cc
121 United Kingdom Stephen Wood 29 May 2000 Whitegates Isle of Man TT Practice Sidecar TT (passenger) Baker Yamaha 600cc
122 United Kingdom Chris Ascott 30 May 2000 Westwood Corner Isle of Man TT Practice Kawasaki ZXR400
123 Northren Ireland Raymond Hanna 31 May 2000 Greeba Castle Isle of Man TT Practice TZ 250cc Yamaha
124 United Kingdom Leslie Williams 9 June 2000 Ballaugh Bridge Isle of Man TT Production TT 1000cc Honda VTR-SP1
125 United Kingdom Colin Daniels 27 May 2002 Bray Hill Isle of Man TT Practice 600cc Suzuki
126 England David Jefferies 29 May 2003 Crosby Isle of Man TT Practice Suzuki GSX-R1000
127 Peter Jarmann 2 June 2003 Bray Hill Isle of Man TT Lap of Honour Bultaco TSS 250CC
128 France Serge le Moal 29 May 2004 Braddan Bridge Isle of Man TT Practice 125cc Honda RS
129 Isle of Man Paul Cowley 2 June 2004 Black Dub Isle of Man TT Practice Sidecar TT (Passenger) 600cc Yamaha Thundercat
130 England Colin Breeze 5 June 2004 Quarry Bends Isle of Man TT Formula 1 TT Suzuki GSX-R1000
131 England Joakim Karlsson 30 May 2005 Douglas Road Corner Isle of Man TT Practice 1000cc Suzuki GSXR
132 England Les Harah 4 June 2005 Parliament Square, Ramsey Isle of Man TT Sidecar Race A 600cc Yamaha
133 United Kingdom April Bloster 10 June 2005 Kirk Michael Isle of Man Senior TT Marshal
134 England Gus Scott 10 June 2005 Kirk Michael Isle of Man TT Senior TT 1000cc Honda CBR
135 Japan Jun Maeda 29 May 2006 Ballahutchin Hill Isle of Man TT Practice 1000cc Honda Fireblade
136 England Marc Ramsbotham 8 June 2007 26th Milestone Isle of Man TT Senior TT 1000cc GSXR Suzuki
137 Isle of Man John Crellin 12 June 2009 Mountain Mile Isle of Man TT Senior TT 1000cc Suzuki
138 New Zeland Paul Dobbs 10 June 2010 Ballagarey Corner Isle of Man TT Supersport TT Race 2 600cc Suzuki
139 Austalia Martin Loicht 10 June 2010 Quarry Bends Isle of Man TT Supersport TT Race 2 600cc Honda
140 England Bill Currie 31 May 2011 Ballacrye Corner Isle of Man TT Practice Sidecar TT 600cc LCR Yamaha
141 England Kevin Morgan 31 May 2011 Ballacrye Corner Isle of Man TT Practice Sidecar TT (Passenger) 600cc LCR Yamaha
142 England Derek Brien 6 June 2011 Gorse Lea Isle of Man TT Supersport TT Race 1 600cc Yamaha
143 Japan Yoshinari Matsushita 27 May 2013 Ballacrye Corner Isle of Man TT Practice 600cc Suzuki
144 England Bob Price 2 June 2014 Ballaugh Bridge Isle of Man TT Supersport TT Race 1 600cc Yamaha]
145 England Karl Harris 3 June 2014 26th Milestone Isle of Man TT Superstock TT 1000cc Kawasaki
146 France Franck Petricola 3 June 2015 Sulby Straight / (Ballacowell) Isle of Man TT Practice BMW S1000RR
147 Austalia Dwight Beare 4 June 2016 Orrisdale North Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT Race 1 [336] 600cc Suzuki LCR
148 England Paul Shoesmith 4 June 2016 Sulby Straight Isle of Man TT Practice BMW S1000RR
149 England Ian Bell 10 June 2016 Ballaspur Isle of Man TT Sidecar TT Race 2[343] 600cc Yamaha LCR
150 England Andrew Soar 10 June 2016 Keppel Gate Isle of Man TT Senior TT 1000cc GSX-R Suzuki
151 England Davey Lambert 6 June 2017 Greeba Castle Isle of Man TT Superbike TT 1000cc Kawasaki
152 Netherland Jochem van den Hoek 7 June 2017 11th Milestone Isle of Man TT Superstock TT 1000cc Honda
153 Republic of Ireland Alan Bonner 7 June 2017 33rd Milestone Isle of Man TT Senior Qualifying BMW S1000RR
154 Isle of Man Dan Kneen 30 May 2018 Sky Hill/(Churchtown) Isle of Man TT Practice BMW S1000RR
155 Scot land Adam Lyon 4 June 2018 Casey’s Isle of Man TT Supersport TT Race 1 600cc Yamaha
156 England Daley Mathison 3 June 2019 Snugborough Isle of Man TT Superbike TT 1000cc BMW

About the author:  Michael Parrotte was the Vice President of AGV Helmets America, and a consultant for KBC Helmets, Vemar Helmets, Suomy Helmets, Marushin Helmets, KYT Helmets, Sparx Helmets. In addition, he is the founder and owner of AGV Sports Group.